Please disable your Ad Blocker to better interact with this website.

Home » Featured »Gun Control »Laws »Politics »Question of the Day: »Self-Defense » Currently Reading:

With DC Gun Ban Lifted, What Laws Will Pass?

With Washington DC’s long history of banning gun ownership or possession in the country’s capitol, what can we expect now that a federal court has overturned the DC gun ban? Once again, gun owners have been left wondering. Following the late July ruling, DC police were instructed to allow DC residents and legal permit holders from other jurisdictions to carry without harassment.

Though the DC Attorney General’s office initially stated they would seek a stay with regards to the ruling while appealing the decision and eventually won a 90 day reprieve while working out new laws, they have finally conceded that their ban on carrying guns in public is simply not fixable and must be replaced with a new law that allows at least some DC residents to carry.

The new law will be difficult to write, to say the least. Within DC proper, there are already a number of overlapping jurisdictions, differing carry types to be considered and the number of federal buildings and national landmarks with their own policies. The delicacy and care with which this law must be wrought has many residents and lawmakers scratching their heads in confusion.

Beyond simply dealing with the law within DC’s borders, there is also the question of how well it will play with others, in terms of CCW reciprocity with both neighboring and distant states. Foreign diplomats and their staff may fall under additional immunities that must be considered. And then there is the question of precedence.

Legal precedence is part of case law. It essentially creates law with every case that is decided. By losing Palmer v. District of Columbia, the district does have the option of pushing its agenda further, but at its own cost. Because Palmer v. DC creates a precedent that says gun bans are unconstitutional on a city level, similar action could create a further push that gun bans would be deemed unconstitutional on a state level, making it more difficult to pursue such action in the future.

The fight for gun rights in DC has won the day, but the battle is far from over. By continuing to fight illegal gun bans or highly restrictive laws, we continue to lay down the precedent of self-defense freedom for ourselves and our posterity, much as our forefathers envisioned.

Image courtesy of Adam Fagen.

Share this article: Share on Facebook0Tweet about this on Twitter0Share on Google+1Share on Reddit0Share on StumbleUpon0Email this to someone
Posting Policy
We have no tolerance for comments containing violence, racism, vulgarity, profanity, all caps, or discourteous behavior. Thank you for partnering with us to maintain a courteous and useful public environment where we can engage in reasonable discourse. Read more.
  • After DC’s general carry issues are sorted out, another piece which needs work are the rules for the Smithsonian institution. They currently allow ‘no sharp objects’ even in outdoor environments like the National Zoo. That means that if my family is spending a day in the area and one of the places we visit during the day is under the Smithsonian, then, technically, even the scissors in my first-aid kit have to come out (I see no posted exceptions in the rules for first responders). That is simply insane and needs to be seriously rethought.

Become a Gun Debate insider

Don't miss a thing. Send us your email address, and we'll make sure to keep you in the loop.